Angel Kane - Kane & Crowell Family Law Center

Best Dressed! 2019 Bridal Style Guide

There’s something about seeing a beautiful bride draped in an amazing gown that hits us all; young and old-right in the feels. Even if you’ve been married for decades, watching a friend or relative try on gowns has the power to make some consider how much more fun your wedding could be now that you have the money to spend on it. Some, not all. But still. It’s no surprise that this is the issue that leaves the Wilson Living team with serious wedding envy.

While white has traditionally been the go-to color for wedding gowns, today’s modern bride craves variety. Not just with length, neckline, and fabric. If fashion magazines and runways at Bridal Fashion week are any indication, today’s bride loves color. We’re not talking about ivory or cream. We’re talking pinks, blues, and grays. So, we couldn’t wait to show off this year’s gowns provided by our good friends with The White Room in Lebanon.

PRETTY IN PINK

If there’s one wedding trend that’s not going away, it’s the blush pink wedding gown. And why would it? Pink dresses add a perfect subtle hint of color. No wonder the color is a favorite of celebrity brides and wedding gown designers alike.


Fun and flirty is how you will feel while wearing this dress. This v-neck ball gown with a floral beaded bodice is complimented with a full ruffled skirt featuring a horsehair hem. Buttons align the zipper to complete the look.

India is wearing a Hamlet Crepe with wide cap sleeves and a sweetheart neckline. Princess seams accent the bodice. A-line skirt with a slight back train. Cortnie is wearing a chiffon high-neck sleeveless gown in slate. It features hook closure at neck with a large keyhole back. Ruched cummerbund accents the waist. Soft gathers surround the skirt.

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

A long sleeved beauty! This allover lace fit and flare gown may appear modest, but the V-neckline and low V-back add the perfect amount of flirtiness. Buttons are placed from the low back to the end of the chapel length train.

A long sleeved beauty! This allover lace fit and flare gown may appear modest, but the V-neckline and low V-back add the perfect amount of flirtiness. Buttons are placed from the low back to the end of the chapel length train.

Our bridesmaid, India is wearing a Bill Levkoff chiffon spaghetti strap gown with crisscross pleats embellishing the bodice. Ruched cummerbund accents the natural waist. Soft gathers adorn the front of the A-line skirt.

MEET OUR MODELS

Wilson County native Monica Duff is an instructor at Hot Yoga Lebanon and is currently working on a masters in exercise science and nutrition at David Lipscomb University. Monica served in the US Airforce before moving back to Lebanon. When she’s not busy guiding local yogis through a powerflow class or studying, she’s active in her church where she volunteers as a life group leader for 6th-grade girls. Monica plans to become a health coach and use this foundation to help young ladies and women learn to love their bodies physically, mentally & emotionally. PLUS, she’s single! We should do something about that!

17-year-old, India Mastin is a junior at Lebanon High School. An honor student, India is on the school’s cross-country team as well as track and field.

10-year-old Cortnie Ragsdale is 5th grader at Carroll Oakland in Lebanon. Cortnie is an honor student and a member of the school’s cross-country team.

A lesson on loss from my friend's mom…

By Becky Andrews

I sat in the passenger seat and made small talk with Sylvia. It was the morning after a sleepover at my friend Paula’s house. At 15 years-old that meant Paula’s mom Sylvia, had to take me home. First, we had to make a detour. Sylvia made a right turn into the closest entrance of the local cemetery. After parking, she opened her handbag and grabbed a greeting card, a piece of pink saran wrap and a plastic fork.

While she fussed with the greeting card and saran wrap, the small talk drifted, and the car became very quiet. I didn’t have a cell phone or iPad to keep my eyes and mind distracted. Nope. It was just me, Sylvia, and the rustling sound of plastic wrap.

It felt like we had been sitting in silence for at least 30 minutes, but my blue faced Swatch indicated it had only been two. Before I could let out a teenage, “why can’t we leave already, I’m so inconvenienced” sigh, Sylvia piped up and said, “This is the hardest day for me.”

She wasn’t saying it to me as much as she was giving herself a pep talk or maybe a short affirmation to let her mind know, “hey, it’s me. This is supposed to feel rotten. You just go through it, girl. We’ll get through this like we always do. Until then, don’t be too hard on yourself.”

When she finished wrapping the card in saran wrap, Sylvia exited the car and walked to a nearby tombstone. She knelt then secured the plastic wrapped greeting card with the plastic fork at the foot of a grey-flecked stone.

She stood there for no more than a minute. When the cloudy sky started spitting out a slow drizzle, she walked back to the car. After plugging in her seat belt, Sylvia turned to look at me. “It’s hard losing your mom, kid. It’s hard losing your mom.” Paying no mind to the clouds, she put on her sunglasses, and we drove away.

I didn’t know what to say or IF I should say something. I just looked at my friend’s mom and studied her tear stained cheeks.

She didn’t know how to celebrate the day made exclusively for the person who brought her into this world. She was feeling Mother’s Day like she had never felt it before. It didn’t matter that she was a grown woman and a mom herself. It mattered that her person-her mom-wasn’t here. She wasn’t just “Paula’s mom” that morning. She was a daughter.

The small talk picked up shortly after pulling away from the cemetery. Fifteen minutes later, we pulled into my driveway. I said thank you and jumped out. Before reaching the front door, Sylvia shouted, “See ya later, Kiddo!” Just like she always did.

I knew then that I wouldn’t forget this otherwise unmemorable trip home from a sleepover. And I never have.

In August of 2004, nearly 15 years after that morning car ride with Sylvia, I became a card-carrying member of the Motherless Child Club. Since then, the heaviness inside me cracks open every year around this time. I also think about that car ride. I think about how at 15 years-old, I witnessed a daughter delicately navigating her way through the grief of losing her mom. I think about how that short drive home on a dreary Saturday taught me that it’s ok to cry. It’s ok to not understand the timing of grief or know how to deal with the waves.  It’s even ok to give side-eye to all the mother/daughter duos eating at the table next to you on Mother’s Day. Just deal and don’t hide from it. Because hiding from uncomfortable feelings is as productive and enjoyable as taking a one-year-old to a Mother’s Day Brunch.

So, no matter what your day looks like this year, enjoy it on your terms (even if it includes giving side-eye to anyone). Your mom would want it that way.

Comments? Email becky@wilsonlivingmagazine.com

What ever happened to Betty Crocker?

By Andrea Hagan

Forget the birthday cake made from a box mix and the waxy primary colored candles of our youth.  Imagine now an event that takes months of planning, countless hours combing Pinterest, Instagram and Etsy in search of the perfect themed event followed by countless hours executing said themed event.  Lots of cash spent, the house wrecked, mom and dad needing to take to bed, and what’s to show for it?  Pictures to prove to your child years down the road that you went insane one day a year? 

Parents, why do we fall into this trap?  While I did not go completely insane, I did go bigger than I intended to for my oldest daughter’s first birthday party.  Surprisingly, my husband was a terrible enabler.  I set out initially to have a mini cake, made by me, with the grandparents over to watch the time-honored ritual of a one-year old smearing icing everywhere.  And that would be that.  

He also used a help of Essay Writing Service in Canada to help me edit this text. I believe that great writers can help you build a nice content and it’s ok to use their services. As for this one, they can help you with any type of writing you want: essaye, researches, reviews, thesis and other stuff.

Except that it wasn’t that.  My husband really pushed for a big party, that it was our first child’s first, after all.  I caved, allowing what should have been simple and stress free to turn into anything but.  Extended family, friends, a buffet of homemade finger foods and treats, two dozen homemade cupcakes, not including the homemade smash cake, a helium tank purchased for the balloons, the perfect birthday girl outfit, monogrammed birthday bib, I could go on here, but you get the picture.  And looking back, this party was low key and modest compared to other parties we’ve attended. 

Who’s to blame for this epidemic?  Perhaps the blame lies with event planners in LA who celebrity moms hire to throw lavish parties for children with “quirky” names such as Apple, Blue Ivy, or Zuma.  

Maybe it’s MTV’s fault (remember MTV?!) for the strangely addictive, train wreck of a television show “My Super Sweet Sixteen”, where bratty teenage girls get their overindulgent parents to drop 10 grand on an over the top birthday extravaganza.  Think red carpet and designer gowns, the hottest band of the moment, security guards at the door, all the while documenting how low we- as a society, have fallen. 

Or it could boil down to the fact that when you become a parent you are suddenly in a secret competition that your child is/has the best, and this competitive nature includes having the “best” birthday party.  And biggest is best.  Add gasoline to this fire, i.e. social media, and it’s the perfect storm for a one upper birthday bash blowout.  (Or we could just stick with blaming celebrities and MTV).

My youngest daughter’s first birthday is a few months away.  Already the debate begins.  I want cake and grandparents.  Now my husband is using a different tact:  Well, since we threw a big party for Emeline’s first, shouldn’t we throw a big one for Natalie, too?  Sneaky.  I’m a middle child and so of course this argument resonates with me.  (Ah, but middle child angst stories are for another day…).  

Will I go insane this time around?  Place your bets here.  Do you go all out for your child/children’s birthday parties or did your own mother know best with her box mix birthday cake set atop a tinfoil covered piece of cardboard? 

Wilson County’s Newest Judge

On December 31st, 2018, Ensley Hagan was sworn in as the new Wilson County General Sessions Judge, Division III following Judge John Gwin’s retirement.

Family and friends gathered for the swearing-in, held the day before Judge Hagan’s official start date of January 1st. Judge Hagan began practicing law in 2007 with his father, Tony Hagan, and wife, Andrea. He is a third generation lawyer and a second generation judge. His grandmother, who was married to the late Judge Willard Ensley “Buck” Hagan was on hand to watch her grandson being sworn in. A native of Wilson County, Judge Hagan, and his wife live in Lebanon with their three children.

Got joint pain?

By Angel Kane
As 2018 year comes to a close, many of us are starting to read up on new and innovative technologies available to us all in the new year. One such medical field that is at the frontier of present-day advancements is the ability to harness and enhance the body’s own innate response to heal and defend itself. To those that have experienced the miraculous power of what is known as regenerative medicine, they are true believers in this new therapy.

Sounds impressive but confusing, right? In layman’s terms, it means our bodies were designed to heal themselves! Makes sense…you cut yourself, it heals.
What would life be like if pain medication were not needed or surgical procedures were no longer necessary? By way of new technologies in the field of regenerative medicine, there are now treatments available to the general public that may enhance your own body’s natural ability to heal without the need for harmful drugs and surgeries. What seemed impossible only a few decades ago, is now not only possible but is our new reality.
Regenerative medicine is a rapidly advancing area of health care that works to repair the injury, not just mask the pain. Unlike treatments that simply address the symptoms, regenerative cell therapy promotes the natural process of repair in the body assisting in restoring degenerated tissue. As we age our bodies degenerate due to cellular death.
By taking cells recovered from completely healthy umbilical tissue, medical practitioners can now treat arthritis, alleviate chronic pain and even combat the natural effects of aging. The field holds the promise of re-engineering damaged tissues and organs by stimulating the body’s own repair mechanisms to functionally heal previously irreparable tissues or organs.
At Inspire Medical & Wellness located in Mt. Juliet, owner and founder Dr. Jason Burchard, supervising physician Dr. Gary Adams and Zack Benner PA-C, are at the forefront of this emerging medical practice. As we know, umbilical cord blood is blood that remains in the placenta and in the attached umbilical cord after childbirth. This cord blood contains stem cells, which can be used to treat a number of disorders and has been for over two decades now. Inspire Medical & Wellness obtains their mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton’s jelly inside the umbilical tissue from New Life, a multi-state and FDA approved cord bank that screens donors and extracts the cells from the umbilical cord. New Life is registered with the American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB).
Therapies utilizing this umbilical tissue are countless – from regenerating damaged skin, accelerate healing and alleviating pain. At Inspire Medical & Wellness, patients can find safe and effective treatments for knee, shoulders, hips, elbows, wrists and even neuropathy available without the harmful side-effects or pain.
Their treatments can be used as a stand-alone therapy or in conjunction with other available medical treatments. Inspire also specializes in medical weight loss and bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. So, if you are tired of living with chronic pain, now is the time to take control! Contact Inspire Medical & Wellness today at 615-453-8999 and receive a complimentary consultation until December 15th and visit their website at www. weightlossmtjuliet.com for more information.
The new year is almost upon us, isn’t it time you took that first step into a whole new and pain-free you!
Inspire Medical & Wellness is located at 151 Adams Ln, Suite #18, Mt. Juliet, TN 37122.
 

What are stem cells?

Stem cells are the basic building blocks of human tissue and have the ability to repair, rebuild, and rejuvenate tissues in the body. When a disease or injury strikes, stem cells respond to specific signals and set about to facilitate the healing process by stimulating your own body to repair itself.

How do stem cells work?

Stem cells that come from perinatal tissue(healthy post-natal C-sections) have distinct functional properties including immunomodulation and anti-inflammation which support the repair and regeneration of damaged tissue associated with disease and injury.

When do we use the body’s stem cells?

We tap into our body’s stem cell reserve daily to repair and replace damaged or diseased tissue. When the body’s reserve is limited and as it becomes depleted, the regenerative power of our body decreases and we succumb to disease and injury.

Compassionate Hands

By Jill Waggoner
Six years ago, a dozen ministers and local church members, led by those from Cross Style Church, decided to investigate what they had been told — that a small homeless community was growing in Wilson County. On a winter day, they went into the “woods” of Lebanon behind one of our busiest thoroughfares and found evidence of a homeless camp, including tents, groceries and diapers. Troubled and burdened by this discovery, the small group decided on one simple goal: No one would freeze to death in Wilson County. This goal ultimately lead to the formation of Compassionate Hands, a ministry to the homeless population with a vision “that the Wilson County community of faith be Christ’s hands and feet to our neighbors in need.”
Wilson County is buzzing with new growth — economic and population — creating wonderful opportunities and experiences for its people, but with that growth has come an unintended consequence. As property values rise and rent payments go up, many families and individuals are having trouble finding or keeping affordable housing. In addition, as word spreads about the job creation happening in Middle Tennessee, people from all over the country have arrived on a search for opportunity, but without much of a plan. These factors, along with the inescapable difficulties of life, have left a small portion of our population without a home.

In our region, homelessness is assessed by the Homeless Advocacy for Rural Tennessee Continuum of Care, which is organized under the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Their most recent “point-intime” count found 25 homeless individuals in our county on a night in January 2018.
Compassionate Hands provides temporary shelter for men and women in Wilson County every night in the winter months. A large network of volunteers from churches of all sizes keeps the system running each night. Those in need of shelter arrive at Cross Style church for dinner each evening. After a short vetting process, these individuals are taken to three different host sites — two for the men and one for women. A rotating group of churches offer their facilities to house the men and women. The homeless are provided a safe and warm place to sleep, as well as a warm breakfast. Laundry service and the ability to take a shower are also available. In the morning, a bus takes the individuals to various places across the county and leaves them with a sack lunch.
The coordination among so many churches and volunteers requires significant oversight and this October, John Grant, formerly a minister at College Hills Church of Christ, began serving as the full time minister and executive director of Compassionate Hands.
Grant was a part of that original group who visited the homeless camp and began ministering to the homeless in 2013. He is the first full time staff member for Compassionate Hands. Though the decision to leave College Hills was a sad one for Grant, it was in many ways, an easy one, because of his desire to serve the community, his network of friends at churches and his personal giftings.
“I think it was a call from God. This was a ‘John Grant’ shaped role,” he said.
Grant is joined by a board of directors in leading the ministry, each from a different church in the area. They include Dawn Bradford from Fairview Church, Joyce Gaines from Cook’s United Methodist Church, Mark Taylor from The Glade, Michelle Wilde from First United Methodist Church in Lebanon, and Steve Wheeley of the Salvation Army.
All of those involved in the ministry are quick to point out misconceptions about the homeless. They regularly and lovingly refer to them as their “homeless friends.” Many of those in need who have come to Compassionate Hands have full-time jobs and cars. Many are locals who grew up in our community and have fallen on hard times.
In Grant’s experience, he estimates that “one third have an addiction. One third have mental illness and a third have had bad luck.”
“I was scared and concerned about inviting homeless people into our church building,” Grant said describing his church’s first evenings with Compassionate Hands. “What I’ve learned is that the homeless people were also scared of us and skeptical of churches. They’re spending the night with strangers too. Homeless people are really not that different from you and me.”
“The Good Samaritan is one of our key stories,” Grant said, referencing the story found in Luke 10. “We think Jesus is bringing us people who are battered and bruised by life.”
Brandt Waggoner, lead pastor at Fairview Church, said their partnership with Compassionate Hands is important for their church.
“These are people in need right in the middle of our community,” Waggoner said. “We cannot turn a blind eye to that. In addition, it’s remarkable how the churches across our area are seamlessly partnering together to serve this group. We want to be a part of that.” Dawn Bradford has served with the ministry for three years and says Compassionate Hands has “absolutely changed my life.” Bradford continues, “Yes, it’s inconvenient and sometimes a little uncomfortable, but it’s not about me, it’s about living out the biblical principle of thinking of others before your own needs.” John Ashman, a member of Faith Lutheran Church, is a volunteer with Compassionate Hands, along with his wife Bonnie. Their experience serving has made a profound impact on their lives. “Often when we see homeless people on the street, we may see them as lazy, dirty, and not worthy of respect. But when we sit by them during the evening or morning and talk with them about their lives, we see that they are usually people who have had a some bad breaks,” Ashman said. One of the most emotional moments for Ashman came last Christmas. “Due to the generosity of our church members, we were able to put together backpacks with a number of food items, personal care products and some warm hats and gloves,” Ashman said. “Church members wrapped the items, so that on Christmas morning, they were able to open the presents, just as if they were living with their families. One man said ‘It’s been a long time since anybody gave me a Christmas present.” Every year, the ministry has experienced growth. At the close of last winter, 34 churches from 16 faith traditions had contributed to Compassionate Hands, providing over 5,000 beds and 11,000 meals to 400 homeless individuals since 2013. “Every winter we’ve seen two or three people who go from homeless to established,” Grant said. “They’ve gotten on their feet, into housing and are now volunteering in our ministry.” The leadership of Compassionate Hands desires to meet even more needs of the homeless. Their first objective is to secure an office space, but hope the years to come allow them to be able to provide shelter for families with children, as well as lockers, classroom space, and computer lab. For more information about Compassionate Hands or if you or your church would like to be involved, please visit compassionatehandstn.org, like their Facebook page or email John Grant at jgrant1817@gmail. com.

Coming Home

By Dr. Adam Tune
Photos by Mary Beth Richerson
 
When I was 12 years old, my family moved from Northern Louisiana to Wilson County. Being the son of a preacher, moving was nothing new, and the place my parents bought on Old Horn Springs Road in Lebanon would be the 4th house that I would call home. Immediately upon our arrival, I felt like I had been missing out on life. The first time we drove around, we saw streets with names like “Stumpy Lane” and “Tater Peeler Road.” The first time we went out for dinner, I learned that I could order off of a breakfast menu. That first week I was introduced to both Country Music and College Football. And on our first Sunday at the new church, I met a 6th grade blond girl with the prettiest green eyes I had ever seen. I remember thinking to myself “I have arrived!”

But that move here also brought with it something else, something I wasn’t ready for. A Community. Most of my new friends had not only lived here their whole life, but their grandparents lived here too. Everyone knew everybody. They didn’t just have homes; they had a homestead. The people here seemed to have found the good life, and I was a little jealous.
As a teenager, I decided that a community was not good at all. Not only did everyone know everybody, but I felt like everyone was concerned about everybody. When I got paddled at school, my mom knew about it before I got home. Once after being pulled over on West Main, my dad paged me while the officer was writing the ticket because someone had passed by and called him. The Mayor would say “Tell your Daddy I said ‘Hey!’” and the ladies at the bank would ask “How’s you momandem?” By the time I graduated, I no longer thought that I had arrived. All I could think was “I’ve got to get out of here!”
My parents moved to Virginia after I graduated High School, and when I started College at MTSU, I was ready to leave too. Only I couldn’t completely leave. I was still in love with that blond green-eyed hometown girl, and after six years Kimberly Carey had finally noticed me. We began dating our senior year, and even though I had moved to Murfreesboro, I made many trips back to Lebanon to be with her and her family. And even after attempting to move to Virginia to be with my parents and work in D.C., I was still in love with Kimberly, and I just couldn’t stay gone. We married in 2001, and her father built our first house one mile down from their home on Coles Ferry Pike.

For the next 8 years we continued to work and live here in Wilson County. During that time our family grew and we moved 3 more times. I was restless. In the back of my mind, I still thought “I got to get out of here!” And in 2009, we did. I became the preacher for a church in Maryland and for the next 7 years I would only return to Wilson County a handful of times. But living up north, I began to miss
being a part of a community.
Kimberly and I wanted to move to a place where we could finally put down roots and create a place for our kids to return when they moved away. We almost moved to North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Memphis. But in 2016, I accepted the job as the minister for the UNA Church of Christ in Nashville, and we moved right back to Wilson County. Shortly after returning, we discovered that we didn’t need to put down roots nor did we have to make a home for ourselves. Our roots were already established. We were returning to the homestead.
Upon our return to Lebanon, I began to feel nostalgic about my surroundings, and soon I wrote my first book—a 25-day Christmas Devotional that celebrates the memories of Holiday tradition and rejoices in the remembrance of the nativity story. It was published in September and released just in time for that season of the year where we celebrate faith, family, and friends. Back to Bethlehem, a 25-day Christmas Devotional, can be purchased through Amazon and locally at Square Market.

But if you are from Wilson County, you are already accustomed to this kind of celebration. Here faith, family and friends don’t just come together once a year. It happens every day. Here we know one another. Here we’re concerned for one another. When you have a community, you don’t have to search for the good life. You live it. You miss it when it’s gone. And you hold it tighter when you get it back.
Now as I drive the streets of Stumpy Lane and Tater Peeler Road, as I watch my kids attend the same school that we attended, as I order my dinner off the breakfast menu, as I watch football with my childhood friends, and as I write this sitting in my new home…back on Coles Ferry Pike… right behind my in-laws, I think to myself “I have arrived!”

Dental excellence. Compassionate care. Patriot Dental gives Wilson County a reason to smile

By Becky Andrews
2014 was a big year for Dr (Retired USAF Colonel) Paul and Elaine Nawiesniak. After an impressive military dental career that spanned nearly three decades and moves to eight different bases; including one in Japan, Dr. Nawiesniak decided it was time to retire and begin a new adventure right here in Wilson County.

While military service certainly enabled Dr. Nawiesniak and his family to travel many roads, there was one road he had not taken; private practice. “We had visited middle Tennessee several times and fell in love with this area. So, it made sense to concentrate our search for a practice opportunity in Tennessee. We explored several options before deciding to purchase the thriving dental practice of the now retired Dr. Wayne Johnson in Lebanon.” Dr. Nawiesniak continues, “Lebanon has both small-town charm and the potential for growth that made it the perfect choice for us.”
Patriot Dental (the name, an homage to Nawiesniak’s; military background) opened for business on June 14, 2014. His time in the Air Force gave Dr. Nawiesniak training and education that enables him to offer the best possible care to patients. He earned his undergrad in Biology from Loyola in Chicago and completed dental school at Northwestern University in Chicago. While in the Air Force Dr. Nawiesniak was selected to attend their two-year Advanced General Dentistry Residency Program. Upon finishing, he became certified with the American Board of General Dentistry. After more than 1200 hours of continuing education, Dr. Nawiesniak became a Fellow and then a Master of the Academy of General Dentistry. An impressive fete considering only 2% of all dentists carry this designation. In fact, he is the only dentist in Wilson County who is certified by the American Board of General Dentistry.
Dr. Nawiesniak works side by side with his wife of 27 years, Elaine. In addition to her duties as office manager, Elaine is a Registered Nurse and an accomplished photographer.

While Patriot Dental initially started out occupying the same space as Johnson Family Dentistry, as their patient list grew- thanks to word of mouth and the Nawiesniak’s community involvement- it was clear that they needed more room. “Our goal when we purchased the practice was to move to a new office within five years and we were able to do that ahead of schedule.” The Nawiesniak’s renovated an existing retail space located in Signature Place on the west side of Lebanon.
Their new state of the art facility provides patients with a comfortable, modern home-like environment. Elaine says their new space is a win/win. “We upgraded most of our equipment to reflect the digital age and are constantly striving to make changes that both improve our patient experience and make our staff’s jobs easier.”

As the dental industry continues to evolve, along with technology and advanced education, Dr. Nawiesniak says patient focus is essential now more than ever. “Our goal is to meet patient’s where they are in their dental needs and work with them to achieve the best possible outcomes for their oral health.” Dr. Nawiesniak continues, “We recognize that not everyone has always had access to dental care and may be embarrassed to seek care. We find helping these patients to be particularly rewarding. To help those who don’t have dental benefits we offer an in-house discount plan that is focused on preventative care which we emphasize in our office”.
With more than 100 years of experience between them, Dr. Nawiesniak and his staff are eager to meet all your dental needs. Stop by to visit them at their brand-new location, 99 Signature Pl, Lebanon, TN 37087
Our front desk receptionist, Beth Williams, has lived in Lebanon her entire life. She always has a smile on her face and has the best laugh! She has over 20 years’ experience in dealing with the always challenging insurance issues that arise daily and is an amazing multi-tasker! She does her best to help our patients manage their benefits to their maximum. She keeps everyone humming along. We affectionately refer to as our Queen “B”.

Our lead hygienist, Jace Crooks, is the perfect fit for our office. She is originally from Minot ND which was one of Dr. Nawiesniak’s prior duty stations in the Air Force, so he bonded with her instantly over stories of life in freezing weather, ice fishing and her fun North Dakota expressions. She received her hygiene training at Tennessee State University and has been a hygienist for 15 years. Her attention to detail and genuine care for our patients make her an asset to our office. Our other hygienist, Debbie Page, came to us searching for a privately-owned dental practice to work part-time in after she and her husband Mark moved to Lebanon from Ohio. She brings over 20 years of experience. Both of our hygienists have helped us grow our practice thru education that emphasizes preventive care.

Our lead assistant, Andrea Griffin, received her training at Nashville Staff and is an expanded duties assistant with over 20 years of experience. Andrea has a talent for making patients feel comfortable. She and her husband Mark live in Antioch and are planning to eventually relocate to Lebanon. She loves music, craft beer, and fishing. She’s also a die-hard Alabama fan but don’t hold that against her!
Our newest team member is assistant Miranda Walker. Miranda is from Lebanon and is a graduate of Vol State University. She and her husband just purchased their first new house in Hartsville. We call her the Swiss Army Knife of our office. She does whatever needs doing in our office and always with a servant’s heart.
Dr. Nawiesniak›s wife, Elaine, is our office manager and marketing director. Elaine is originally from Louisiana and is an emergency room trained RN. Her military spouse philosophy has always been to «Bloom Where You are Planted» and she has done her best to embrace Wilson County as our forever home. She is a member of the Lebanon Noon Rotary Club where she serves as Sergeant at Arms, she is on the membership committee for the Lebanon Wilson Chamber of Commerce and is the Treasurer for Wilson One, a local woman›s networking group that focuses on community service. She is a graduate of Leadership Wilson Class of 2018.
***Our services include general restorative dentistry using tooth-colored filling material and all ceramic crowns and bridges, cosmetic dentistry including veneers, teeth whitening, root canal therapy, periodontal therapy for treating gum disease, extractions, and implant restoration, as well as partials and dentures.***

10th Annual Wilson Living Holiday Expo!

By Angel Kane
If you haven’t noticed the holidays are here! And we couldn’t be more excited as Christmas is our favorite time of year. To celebrate all things Christmas, 10 years ago we started the Wilson Living Holiday Expo and are excited to be bringing you a bigger, brighter and better Holiday Expo than in year’s past.

General admission day tickets are $6.00 on Friday, November 16th
The doors open bright and early on Friday and will stay open until 4 p.m. for the general public. This year we have included more booth space and will have three buildings filled to the brim, as well as various outdoor vendors on hand. Vendors were hand selected for their unique products, and to encourage more local participation we allowed vendors to share space this year, to bring in even more selection. That means there is something for everyone on your holiday shopping list including gifts, clothing, jewelry, holiday decor, art, as well as tasty treats and warm drinks.
Gala tickets are $16.00 on Friday
On Friday the Expo doors will close at 4 p.m. and reopen at 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the Holiday GALA party. Different tickets are needed to attend the GALA. Once inside our ticketed guests will be treated to tasty treats and drinks courtesy of Sammy B’s, swag bags filled with great free products and exclusive vendor discounts just for our special guests. Santa will be on hand for free photos as well. It’s a night of holiday music, twinkling lights and shopping galore – so be sure to bring a few friends and kick off the holidays at the best holiday party of the year!
General admission day tickets are $6.00 on Saturday, November 17th
On Saturday we reopen our doors at 10 a.m. and will again stay open until 4 p.m. Friday or Saturday General Admission Tickets, as well as GALA tickets, can be purchased online on our website at www.wilsonlivingmagazine.com, on the Wilson Living Magazine Facebook page, at various Wilson Bank & Trust locations, as well as at the door. $1.00 of every ticket sale will go to the Agricultural Center Management Fund.
On Saturday, Mrs. Claus will be on hand for free photos with the children and various book readings. We also will have various local authors on hand for book signings.
Vendor Booths
The great thing about the Fairgrounds is all the space! If you are a local vendor and want to participate, give us a call at 615-818-4646 or 615-364-9082 or email us at info@wilsonlivingmagazine.com. We want to have as many booths as possible for all those attending so don’t delay!
Thank You to our Sponsors
We have been blessed with continued support, not just from the community, but from our Sponsors over the years. Once again this year, Wilson Bank & Trust, Tri-Star Summit Medical Center, Vein Centre, The Lett Center, WANT, Advanced Signs and Sammy B’s, are sponsors. We appreciate their support and what they all do for this community.
Save the dates! November 16 & 17 & SEE You aLL Soon!! If you haven’t been before, this is the year to come out. If you have been before, then come back to see all the returning vendors you love plus many, many new ones. It’s ten years in the making and we can’t wait to see you all very soon!

Fellowship House

By Laurie Everette
Chuck Keel said he didn’t get to Fellowship House in Lebanon by accident. This respite and place of redemption helps addicts get on the straight and narrow, and, it keeps its residents accountable.
Keel is the director of operations of Fellowship House now. Ten years ago, beer took away his spirit. Four failed marriages and dozens of jobs had gone bad. Keel was a train wreck in the worst degree.

“I had gone as far as I could go,” he said. “I could not pay the rent. I was not working. I loved the beer better than jobs and four wives.” He said he had 15 seconds of a lapse in judgement and swallowed a handful of pills to end his misery. But, he had a epiphany two seconds afterward, and called 911 to save his own life.
From that day forth he never had a drink again. It was the ultimate “hit bottom” moment. And now he runs the house – and who better to uplift and steer-straight addicts than a reformed addict who has been down that road and can support and uplift? He’s been there and done that. The near-death experience made him sober, but, he remained sober with the help of Fellowship House.
“I became involved in their daily Bible study and that is what kept me on track,” he said.
Now, Keel mentors Fellowship House clients in his role at the house. He helps men from the abyss of addiction and guides, restores and supports them so they can live full lives; free from alcohol and drugs.
Currently, there are more than a half-dozen men in residence.
“The coffee pot is always on,” said Keel. “We are open from 5:30-9:30, 365 days a year. Anyone is welcome to come as long as they behave. The men who live here have rules they have to follow. They are given a guide – a structure that will, if they adhere to the rules, in many cases, lead them back to a real life; a clean, productive and sober life.”
Lebanon attorney Gloria Jean Evins is very aware of Fellowship House. Her husband, the late Eddie Evins of Cracker Barrel fame, was instrumental in the start of Fellowship House.
On April 24, 1992, the College Street Fellowship House was turned into a 501c. Since that time, Fellowship House has been used as a “half-way house” for those in recovery from addictions to alcohol and other drugs.
Today, modest rent is charged to those who come to live just out of treatment or jail. They have access to a kitchen, living room, shower and their own bed. They are required to attend daily recovery meetings, stay clean and sober and get a job. They also must agree to random drug tests. There’s a curfew.
“Lives are transformed at Fellowship House,” said Keel. “It can change you if you take it seriously. For me also with the help of Christ.”
Though not officially connected to Alcoholics Anonymous, Fellowship House hosts daily meetings at their place and these are mandatory for their residents.
David Denney is the current Fellowship House chairman of the board. He got sober in 1984.
“I got into trouble,” he explained.
He had three DUI’s and one ended in a vehicle homicide. He knew that was his ultimate bottom. Now, he nurtures Fellowship House residents, and, is a role model of sobriety.
Fellowship House holds 22 meetings each week and there is a daily Bible Study in the morning. An important component is “Chicken Church” on Sunday that starts at 10:30 a.m. During church, residents learn lessons about living life on life’s terms.
Denny said Fellowship House has a good history of reforming residents.
“I’m proud of it, it saved my life,” he said. “I have a wonderful life, a son and two grandchildren.”
A resident’s story
Larry Garner, 62, is a current resident at Fellowship House. He had a good living as an electrician. In 2009, he had a work accident and his ribs and collarbone and back were hurt.
“They put me on pain meds,” he said.
In 2010, he had an automobile accident and broke both legs. It was a disaster in the making. He was put on disability and was addicted to drugs.
“But, my primary drug was alcohol,” he said.
“One was too many and 1,000 not enough.”
He had three DUI’s in some months. Spent time in jail. His driver’s license was taken away.
“I was depressed and angry and full of self-pity,” he said.
One day he went to an AA meeting and saw a guy without legs, and another guy with cancer, and another guy blind.
“I realized how blessed I was,” he said.
He said Fellowship House has helped him believe how blessed he is. He is now working, and, working out.
“I’m building a bridge,” said Garner.
Denney said it’s these transformation that solidify the work at Fellowship House.
“On the surface,” said Denney. “We provide a bed, clean living space, hot showers and the necessities of living. But actually, we provide a lot more. We encourage work on the spiritual side as well as the physical side. So many of the men coming in here, have nothing. They are financially, physically and often spiritually bankrupt. Our job is to get them started on the road back – the right road. Without that, most return to the streets and continue to be a financial drain on the community and the county.”
In October, Fellowship House held its 5th annual fundraising dinner at the fairgrounds. It was a catfish and chicken dinner and dedicated in the memory of Dr. Larry Locke, who was the founder of the dinner and former chairman of the board at Fellowship House.
Denney said the outreach needs money to possibly expand, but will continue to focus on serving the community and provide a safe, structured environment for men who have nowhere else to go, outside of the streets and a life of addiction.
Fellowship House is located at 206 South College Street in Lebanon.
Lisa

Navigating the Medicare Maze with IMS

By Laurie Everett
Jennifer Pollock Osborne is a self-described Medicare nerd. She’s also a highly successful local business owner who is all about empowering women to find their nugget in the business world and blaze a path toward individual independence – while extending a service that is invaluable to others.
A mother of adult twin girls and a son, Jennifer has forged a business that is solid and highly respected. She is the Agency Principal of IMS (Insurance Management Services). Her division is located in Mt. Juliet on North Mt. Juliet Road. It’s solely operated by women.

In layman’s terms (because it’s pretty complicated), Jennifer and her team help people figure out their health or Medicare insurance needs and then help them get enrolled into the plan they’ve pinpointed best for them.
In other words, they are a lifeline to people who all of a sudden realize they are reaching the golden age of retirement and are completely in the dark on what to do, insurance-wise. It’s a scary place and Jennifer eases the navigation process in a way only a woman long experienced in this field can.
Jennifer has been in this business for over 20 years, on her own. Her father opened IMS in 1992. She worked for him
and learned the ropes. When he retired he sold IMS, with the exception of Jennifer’s book of business. She restarted a division of IMS and focused on her expertise, which is Medicare and health.
“I handled COBRA benefits back then,” she said. “I learned about Medicare, both individual and family.”
Jennifer said she originally wanted to be a doctor. “Two of my kids are in the medical field now,” she noted. But, she loved her job in the insurance field, and, had a goal to be self-employed. She got the nerve to forge her own path and refocus.
“I am not the only woman in this office who has had to jump off a cliff with a leap of faith to start on my own,” said Jennifer. “The woman who work with me had to make the same choices, and basically started from scratch. Jaime and I went to Mt. Juliet High School together and have worked together for 20 years.”
Jaime worked for Jennifer’s dad at his insurance agency. And, Jaime’s mother, Judy, left her job and decided to come and work with Jennifer.
“Tricia is my assistant and is newly licensed!” said Jennifer. “None of these ladies started here with any salary at all, except Tricia. They had to meet with clients and earn the trust of those clients and be paid by insurance companies. They are all very good at what they do.”
In simple terms, what they “do” is some small group plans, but their specialty is the individual, and especially, the Medicare demographic.
“Medicare is a very complicated beast with many working parts,” Jennifer explained. “There are laws, penalties, enrollment windows, special elections, different plan types and structures and so much more that it makes most peoples’ heads spin. When someone is approaching the golden age of 65, they are bombarded with mail from companies that sell Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage plans and Medicare Part D drug plans and they also get telephone calls from people trying to get them to purchase a product from them. It’s somewhat of a predatory market in my opinion.”
What IMS does is different. They sit down with each client, face to face, and draw a picture to help them understand their different options.

“We want them to be educated on the different Medicare options, not just be told what is best for them,” this entrepreneur explained. “Once we educate them on the different routes, we then go over their list of doctors, medications, and medical issues to see what may best fit their needs.”
Jennifer said the Medicare product landscape has changed drastically over the last 12 years and is still changing, “for the better.” They are paid by the insurance companies and the government sets the amount they are allowed to pay them so they are not biased toward one plan verses another.
“We also represent every plan available in the state,” she said. “Our storage room is like Disneyland for a Medicare nerd like myself!”
Jennifer said while it’s not easy being a woman entrepreneur in such a competitive field, she loves her team like family.
“We absolutely love our clients and we love what we do,” she said with a smile. “We have a lot of fun together and we trust each other wholly.”
IMS is also a trade partner for Del Webb retirement community in Mt. Juliet. They love the Del Webbers and they cover the entire state of Tennessee, as well as some other states.
Jennifer has been there and done that in her field, successfully. She encourages other women to take that leap of faith to self-employment.
“It’s OK to be scared,” she advised. “It’s a day to day faith walk. I know everything is OK, as long as my family is OK.”
And during “open enrollment” for Medicare she works dusk to dark, she reiterated her career journey is worth it all.
“It’s hard sometimes, but it’s a great journey,” she said. And, because Jennifer and her team believe in “self-care” and the important knowledge that you can’t pour an empty vessel, each year Jennifer takes her team on a cruise in January – a girls’ trip for sure.
“We all agree that it is the most fun trip we’ve all ever been on,” she laughed.
This boss trusts her team so much, she took a family trip to Ireland in September to refresh and recharge and spend time with her loved ones.
To talk to Jennifer and learn how to navigate retirement insurance, call IMS at 615.831.3800

Underneath it all… building a solid foundation begins with Healthy Fashions

By Becky Andrews

While the doors have been open for just over one-year, Healthy Fashions is already an under-the-radar hit in Wilson County. Specializing in intimates, loungewear and body care products, shop owner Angela Mueller says opening a brick and mortar location has enabled her to expand the products she offers including a full line of CBD Daily Products. “The hemp company we work with started manufacturing hemp products in 1996, and we started working with them in 1998. So, when they broke into CBD products, it was a logical addition to our current line.” Mueller continues, “I knew nothing about CBD at that time and jumped in with Hope. I had Plantar Fasciitis bad at that time, and they told me to try the CBD Cream….viola, it worked!!! I have been a passionate advocate ever since.”

CBD, or Cannabidiol, is one of over 110 natural cannabinoids and is a non-psychoactive component of the Hemp or Cannabis plant. It possesses many of the healing properties without the “high” that is delivered by THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol). Mueller is committed to helping the community understand the beneficial properties of CBD, which has long been used as a natural remedy for a multitude of ailments.
Healthy Fashions new storefront also gives Mueller the opportunity to have a more hands-on experience with customers. Something that’s essential when many patrons have so many questions about CBD. “I always ask what the objective is from the new CBD customer to help them make the best and most economical decision. I am in this for the long run, not a quick sale. I find that most people that try the topical can feel almost immediate benefit from pain. We are a society fixated on NOW results, and the CBD topical I have will satisfy that need. CBD Drops, and Capsules are not an immediate fix for most people. It is something that you will need to find your sweet spot on as far as dosing and dosage.”
In addition to a full line of CBD products that include everything from pain-relieving topicals to shampoo and conditioner and oral drops to disposable vape pens; Mueller carries an impressive range of loungewear from Hello Mello, Shirley of Hollywood and Natural Inspirations.
With seemingly endless choices when it comes to lady’s loungewear, intimates, and CBD products-especially online, Mueller knows that offering a personal interactive shopping experience and a staff with extensive product knowledge, sets Healthy Fashions apart. “We are a face and a place. We want you to be happy with our service and our products.”
Originally from Chicago, Mueller has lived in Wilson County since 2004. She and her husband, Grant live in Lebanon with their four-year-old, Gunner. Mueller also has two adult children, Aaron and Amber.
Healthy Fashions is located inside The Mill at Lebanon 300 North Maple Street, Suite 4118 615-453-1129.
Can’t make it to the store? You can now purchase products online www.TheDropsofHope.com
Become a fan on Facebook, and you’ll find out when Healthy Fashions will be hosting their next educational event. www.facebook.com/HealthyFashions
*

A Market with a Mission

By Jill Waggoner
Photos By Hannah Vermilye
What began with the spark of an idea on a Sunday morning has become a two-day, full family event with an international impact.
Fairview Church hosted its fourth annual Fairview Missions Market, an artisan craft and food event, supporting local and international mission organizations & mission trips, as well as local businesses, Sept. 21 and 22 in Lebanon, Tenn.

This year’s Fairview Missions Market featured live music, food trucks and 50 vendor booths from local artists, craftsmen, and farmers selling handmade crafts, goods and locally grown produce. Despite a few rain showers over the weekend, the event welcomed almost 1,500 visitors and raised approximately $7,000.
Four years ago, a community group of Fairview Church that included Lacie Aldret of Carthage, Tenn., decided to host an artisan craft fair and use proceeds to fund mission endeavors.
“It was a way that we could spread the gospel, fund mission work, use the resources and talents we had to glorify God, and grow together as a group,” said Aldret, who now serves as the Fairview Missions Market director.
“Missions is at the heart of our church family,” said Brandt Waggoner, lead pastor of Fairview Church. “We want everything we do to be focused on sharing the Gospel here and around the world. The bonus to the Missions Market is that we get to do this while providing a platform for artists and local businesses to share their work.
“God is a God of creation and we want to celebrate the creativity of people in our community and know that our efforts can be used by God to spread the message of hope in Christ at the same time.”
Proceeds from this year’s event will go toward supporting Fairview Church’s missions teams who will serve in Central Asia and Central America. Previous events have support several ministries and mission trips to Guatemala and Israel.
The Missions Market required a great number of volunteers, led by Aldret, to pull off the event. A board of nine volunteers from Fairview led the endeavor and over fifty more individuals gave of their time for weeks and months to plan and execute the event.
“The people you saw volunteering are those who are going to serve people around the world, or who are working on behalf of a ministry,” Waggoner said.
“I love this team of volunteers,” said Aldret. “We’ve really developed a community among us, serving alongside each other. We could not
do this event without them.”
Some of this year’s vendors include Barbara’s Homemade Baskets, Empower Me, The Faith Store, Gnashgirl, Love & Laundry, LulaRoe, My Sister & I, Oh Crumbs Bakery, Psalmbird Coffee, Ralston Farm, Sunshine & Sweet Tea, Turtle Dove Pottery and many more.
In addition to the businesses, many local ministries set up a booth at the Missions Market to draw awareness to their services for the local community, such as the local BackPack ministry, Empower Me, and the Faith Store.
Aldret described how the volunteers at the Missions Marketplace special emphasis on serving the vendors, businesses, and craftsmen who partner with the event, as well as those who attend and shop.
“Once again, we received feedback from our vendors about the huge impact Fairview Church’s volunteers made on them,” Aldret said. “Our Fairview community seeks to care for and love on the vendors and customers in a way that leaves them looking forward to the next Fairview Missions Market, which has turned out to be one big mission trip in itself.”
Organizers are already making plans for next year’s Missions Market, which will take place Sept. 27 and 28, 2019.
They would like to provide more fun activities for families, extend the silent auction and increase indoor vendor space in 2019. If you are interested in supporting the missions trips through Fairview Church, Missions Market T-shirt’s are still available for purchase, and sponsors and donations are accepted all year long. More information is available at the Fairview Missions Market Facebook page or by calling 615-444-0111.

Making a Difference…5th Annual Fellowship House Fundraiser

5th Annual Fellowship House Fund Raiser, Oct. 11.
 
The 5th Annual Fellowship House fundraising dinner is set for the East-West Bldg. at the James E. Ward Ag. Center, Thursday evening, Oct. 11 at 6:00 P.M. This is the only fundraiser the Fellowship House, a transitional house for men, located at 206 S. College, holds. Funds are needed to continue expansion to keep up with the growing demand in Wilson County/Lebanon. Judge David Earl Durham will be a brief keynote speaker. The dinner this year, is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Larry Locke, former board chairman and longtime supporter of the FH.
The dinner, consisting of fried catfish or chicken and all the trimmings is just $25 per plate and the total amount is tax deductible. “Last year, we had about 150-people attend.” Said FH board chairman, David Denney. “The dinner, our only fundraising event has continued to grow and is a huge success. But as Wilson County and Lebanon continue to explode in population, the demand for our services dictates that we expand. That takes money and this is our only way to raise funds. We are not subsidized or affiliated with an organization.

The FH is home for 10-men, most coming from incarceration or drug court and battling an addiction to drugs, alcohol or both. Once released from jail, most have nowhere to go and few belongings. If the return to a life on the streets, most will quickly end up back in jail.
The FH is more than just a transition house. At least 22 meetings are held each week and there is a daily Bible Study at 7:25 each morning. On Sunday, an extended Bible study called “Chicken Church” starts at 10:30. Everyone is welcome and a chicken dinner is served to all who attend, free of charge. All meetings are open to anyone, male or female, needing a meeting-anyone maintaining a clean, sober life, anyone in early recovery or anyone wanting to start.
“On the surface,” said board chairman, David Denney, “we provide a bed, clean living space, hot showers and the necessities of living. But actually, we provide a lot more. We encourage work on the spiritual side as well as the physical side. So many of the men coming in here have nothing. They are financially, physically and often spiritually bankrupt. Our job is to get them started on the road back-the right road. Without that, most return to the streets and continue to be a financial drain on the community and the county.”
“The coffee pot is always on.” Said Chuck Keel, director of operations. “We are open from 5:30-9:30, 365 days a year. Anyone is welcome to come as long as they behave. The men who live here, have rules they have to follow. They are given a guide-a structure that will, if they adhere to the rules, in many cases, lead them back to a real life, a clean, productive and sober life.”
David Denney, added, “We need money, “But our main focus is and should remain on serving the community by providing a safe, structured environment for men who have nowhere else to go but back to the streets and a life of addiction and usually crime.” Denney continued, “Sometime in the future, if we are to even come close to keeping pace with the demand, we are going to have to expand both our housing and our meeting facilities. That is a substantial, financial endeavor. We have no way of doing that without community support. Our board members are strictly volunteers. Nobody gets paid. All the money goes right into the expansion and upkeep of the FH.”
 
“The food and fellowship are great.” Promised Denny. “It would be hard to get a better meal and visit with old friends for that price anywhere.” He added. “The catfish/chicken dinner with all the trimmings is Thursday night, Oct. 11 at 6:00 P.M. in the East-West Bldg. at The Wilson County Fairgrounds in Lebanon. Cost is just $25 a plate and it is tax deductible. Come join us for an hour or two of food and fellowship. We will treat you so many ways, you will have like some of them and we won’t bore you with long-winded speeches. For more information, call 615-449-3891.”

######FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 615/449-3891 or 615-449-4784#############

Fairview Mission Market…a market with a mission

By Jill Waggoner
 
What began with the spark of an idea to reach Wilson County on a Sunday morning has become a two-day, full family event with an international impact.
Fairview Church will host its fourth annual Fairview Missions Market, an artisan craft and food event, to support local and international mission organizations & mission trips, as well as local businesses, Sept. 21 and 22 in Lebanon, Tenn.
Four years ago, a community group of Fairview Church that included Lacie Aldret of Carthage, Tenn., decided to host an artisan craft fair and use proceeds to fund mission endeavors.
“It was a way that we could spread the gospel, fund mission work, use the resources and talents we had to glorify God, and grow together as a group,” said Aldret, who now serves as the Fairview Missions Market director.  
This year’s Fairview Missions Market will feature live music, food trucks and 50 vendor booths from local artists, craftsmen and farmers selling handmade crafts, goods and locally grown produce. This community-wide event will take place Sept. 21 from 2 – 8 p.m. and Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at 1660 Leeville Pike in Lebanon, Tenn. Admission is free.
Having doubled in size since the first Missions Market, the event continues to grow in strategic ways to serve the community, especially families. This year’s event will include free hayrides, face painting, and a kid’s corner with crafts, balloon animals and more.
“Missions is at the heart of our church family,” said Brandt Waggoner, lead pastor of Fairview Church. “We want everything we do to be focused on sharing the Gospel here and around the world. The bonus to the Missions Market is that we get to do this while providing a platform for artists and local businesses to share their work.

“God is a God of creation and we want to celebrate the creativity of people in our community and know that our efforts can be used by God to spread the message of hope in Christ at the same time.”
Last year’s Missions Market drew more than 1,000 attendees and raised over $6,000 for missions. Those funds were used to support several ministries, a medical mission trip to Guatemala, and a mission trip to Israel. This year, the Missions Market hopes to exceed those funds to benefit Fairview Church’s missions teams who will serve in Central Asia and Central America.
The Missions Market requires a great number of volunteers, led by Aldret, to pull of the event. A board of nine volunteers from Fairview lead the endeavor and over fifty more individuals will give of their time to execute the event.
“The people you will see volunteering are those who are going to serve people around the world, or who are working on behalf of a ministry,” Waggoner said.  
“I love this team of volunteers,” said Aldret. “We’ve really developed a community among us, serving alongside each other. We could not do this event without them.”  
Some of this year’s vendors include Barbara’s Homemade Baskets, Empower Me, The Faith Store, Gnashgirl, Love & Laundry, LulaRoe, My Sister & I, Oh Crumbs Bakery, Psalmbird Coffee, Ralston Farm, Sunshine & Sweet Tea, Turtle Dove Pottery and many more.  
In addition to the businesses, many local ministries will also be onsite, such as the local BackPack ministry, Empower Me, and the Faith Store, to draw awareness to their services for the local community.
Aldret described how the volunteers at the Missions Marketplace special emphasis on serving the vendors, businesses, and craftsmen who partner with the event, as well as those who attend and shop.
 
“Our Fairview community seeks to care for and love on the vendors and customers in a way that leaves them looking forward to the next Fairview Missions Market, which has turned out to be one big mission trip in itself.”
More information is available at the Fairview Missions Market Facebook page or by calling 615-444-0111.

Beachcombing and Bemoaning

By Andrea Hagan
 
I love shelling.  It combines some of my favorite things – the beach, physical activity, solitude and attention to detail.  Planning for one of my family’s upcoming Florida trips, I (naively) thought that it was time to introduce my daughter to my beloved pastime.
I envisioned us as a great mother-daughter beachcombing duo.  What fun we would have on our hunt and even better, getting our treasure back home where we would eagerly sort and proudly display our fighting conchs, kitten paws, shark’s eyes, maybe even a prized alphabet cone or two!
 
Then there was the reality of shelling with a toddler.  One of the best shelling spots in Southwest Florida takes some effort to reach.  We set off on bikes for the first stretch, my husband pulling our daughter and her baby brother in the bike trailer.  The second leg requires a one-mile walk along the beach.  My husband pushes our son in the bike trailer and our daughter gets out and takes my hand.  It’s the perfect day for shelling and I smile, excited to create this new tradition with my daughter.

That is until I spot the first fighting conch.  l let go of my toddler’s hand to pick it up and put it in my bag and she whines, “Mom, hold my hand.”  This is my daughter’s latest annoying toddler behavior.  In public, she demands I hold her hand, regardless if I’m holding her brother and a diaper bag plus a bag of groceries, she goes into complete hysterics if I let go of her hand for a split second.  I’m not sure if this is a power struggle, jealousy of her brother, or if she’s becoming Howard Hughes, afraid of people and being in public in general.  So I explain to her that we are shelling and that when we see a pretty shell, we stop and pick it up and I need my other hand to do that.  Two steps later and I spot another shell, and again, “Mom, hold my hand.”  “Mom, hold my hand.”  “Mom, hold my hand.”  “MOM, HOLD MY HAND!”
Now, some of you might be thinking, what a terrible mom complaining that her daughter wants to hold her hand.  I implore you to listen to “Mom, hold my hand” for 150 times, each whine becoming higher in octave and louder than the Gulf of Mexico crashing against the shoreline before you lose your (sea glass) marbles!  My husband tried to help, but he’s pushing baby brother in a bike trailer, not an easy feat on baby powder fine sand. Eventually, my daughter has a complete meltdown and we are forced to put her in the trailer too, which makes strolling on the beach difficult and shelling less than enjoyable.
One mile in means one mile out.  We try to let our daughter walk on the return trip, and it’s still the broken record of “Mom, hold my hand,” but now sprinkled in is, “Mom, hold me” with “Mom, this is too much walking, Can you hold me?”  The hallmark picture perfect mother-daughter shelling tradition that I envisioned sinks right to the bottom of the Gulf and is carried over to Keewaydin Island, probably with the alphabet cone.
I did add a few shells to my collection on that trip.  Just don’t hold the fighting conch up to your ear because all you’ll hear is whine.

Saying Goodbye to Mini-Me

By Angel Kane

At the beginning of the 2017/2018 school year, I had a friend tell me how excited she was about
her son’s Senior Year. “There are so many things to look forward to. Parties, proms and of
course, graduation,” she gushed.

To which I responded, “You know this movie ends badly, right? I’ve seen it before and in the
end, the prince and princess leave you. The End!”

She was a newbie. I had to set her straight. And in the next few weeks, she’ll join our sad little
club.

Soon, our Number 2 will be leaving the nest, just like her sister did.

Number 1 is blond and green-eyed, with a heart of gold like her daddy.

Number 2 is all mine. A little darker, a little tougher, a little mouthier. I know what she’s thinking
before she says it because I’m thinking it too!

Oh, the dreams I have for her.

Most times when I’m talking to her, I feel like I’m talking to my younger self. She rolls her eyes
and doesn’t want to hear it. Much like I didn’t want to. And that’s ok because if life has taught
me anything, it’s that in the end, we all figure it out.

Some do so with more bumps and bruises. My fervent prayer for her is that none of those
bruises leave permanent marks. So, as my Mini-Me gets ready to go, I hope she’ll remember
what I’ve learned thus far…

Keep Moving. Go, go, go. Keep one foot in front of the other even if you don’t know where
you’re going. Get out of bed each morning, wash your face, and for goodness sake do your hair!
Go to work, go to class, just go and then get up the next day and go again and then again and
again. In life, one thing always leads to another. And those that wait, end up waiting a lifetime.

Don’t Be A Snot. It always amazes me how people think they can be ugly and then get their
way. It might work for a minute, but not for much longer than that. And it makes you feel bad
anyway. You will find the kinder you are, the better you’ll feel. People may accuse you of being
too nice, but those are people who don’t know the peace it brings to not constantly be at war.

Don’t Take It. So being kind, doesn’t mean being a pushover. Sadly, some people are just bad
people. They push and shove through life. These people will treat you poorly and when they do,
you need to call them on it and then walk away. Because if you take it, it will chip at your soul.
Your soul is all you’ve got. Protect it at all costs.

Don’t Ever Argue Over Money. Your grandfather’s side of the family taught me this. They didn’t
have a lot, but they were generous with everything they did have and it’s come back to our
family 1000 fold. If a friend thinks you owe them a dollar, give them two. Pick up the tab, help a
friend out, be generous with what you have to everyone you meet. It’s the only way to be.

Eat Right. I know I tell you all the time, that sugar is the devil and you don’t believe me. But it is!
Your same wise grandfather always told me, that you can have everything in moderation. But
not sugar. He was wrong about sugar!

Have Some Quiet Time. You are about to embark on a time in your life where you’ll have the
least amount of quiet time. And that’s ok because you’ll have the energy for it. But every so
often, while your roommate is out, stay in. Especially if it’s a rainy night. Oh, those are the best!
Get a book, get under the covers and just enjoy the quiet. And if you do this, be sure to eat
some sugar. Cookies in bed don’t count.

No One Can Make You Happy. They can make life easier. They can make life more fun. But
happiness is something only you can find. And the secret to finding it, only you can answer. I
know, what a cop-out answer right? But it’s the truth because my happy is not your happy. My
happy is sitting on the porch at 5:30 am writing this article. Your Dad’s happy is staying up late
to read Realclearpolitics.com. Find your own happy and don’t get in the way of someone else’s.

Watch Your Words. Things that are said, cannot be unsaid. You can say “I’m sorry”, but those
ugly words will always be out there. So hold your tongue. I’ve learned this the hard way and 20
years later still regret things I’ve said. So if need be, bite your tongue until it bleeds. I promise,
tomorrow you’ll be glad you did.

Speak It and It Will Happen. This goes back to the power of words. I know it sounds trite. But
I’m a true believer in speaking what you want. Put it out there. And then watch it happen. Say it
out loud and be positive about it. Once you’ve put it out into the universe, the world has a funny
way of hearing it and bringing it to your door.

Always Talk to Strangers. Growing up, I’d cringe as I’d watch my parents talk to anyone,
anywhere. And then I grew up and did the same. You’ve got a double dose of my side of the
family so you might as well realize that deep down, you will love this too! This world is filled with
billions of people, don’t you want to know their story? Oh, the things you will learn. Stick your
hand out, introduce yourself and then wait to hear who they are, where they’re from and how
they got there.

Home Will Always Be Here. Dad and I had many many failings. We worked too much, bought
take-out way too often, and yelled more than was needed. But you see, as you were growing
up, so were we. It’s just how this funny world works. And while we don’t have all the answers, by
now, we do have a few. When life gets tough, come home. We can help you figure it out.
And then when we’re done figuring it out, it will be time for you to leave again. You’ll want to stay
but our job will be to make you go. Don’t worry, though, you are ready for this, and so are we.

To read more of Angel and Becky’s columns go to www.wilsonlivingmagazine.com

Almost all people talk about the eighth episode of the Game of Thrones

Save the Date! 6th Annual Notes for Nurses


Saturday, September 29th at the Wilson County Expo Center promises to be a night filled with great music, food and dancing, and you don’t want to miss it! Now going into its 6th year, the 2018 Notes for Nurses, will be celebrating the five-year impact the event has had on the Cumberland University Nursing Program. With more than 2000 plus attendees, 300 community and student volunteers, and over $300,000.00 in cash, pledges and sponsorships supporting nursing simulation equipment and scholarships, the impact on the
Rudy School of Nursing and Health Professions has been tremendous.
Honorary Chair, Beth McCall, a nurse herself, was the first chair of the event in 2013 and is overwhelmed by the community support. She
notes that “I’m thrilled to see the enthusiasm the event has brought to the nursing program. It has been exciting to see the growth over the last few years and I love seeing the new members and all the energy and ideas that have continued to make the night a success. The money we have raised has allowed the University to purchase a mother-birthing simulator, a child simulator, make technical upgrades to other mannequins and purchase simulation related equipment and software to create training scenarios, all of which are a great benefit to the education of student nurses. We’ve also been able to award over $25,000 in scholarships to 10 deserving students. That is something we are very proud of.” Beth, along with several volunteers created the event and have helped grow it to one of the most popular fundraising showcases in Wilson County.
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This year, Pam McAteer will step into the Event Chair shoes and she is off to a fantastic start, already working tirelessly with her committee
to ensure a fantastic evening. Pam knows the importance of a strong, local nursing program and is happy to support such an impactful
fundraiser. Pam states that “seeing the outpouring of support from the community, with record attendance the past five years, has been
heartwarming. The event would not be possible without all the wonderful volunteers on the Notes for Nurses committee and nursing student volunteers. We are excited to have this year’s event at the beautiful Wilson County Expo Center and want to encourage our local businesses to get involved, as this is a cause that truly impacts all of us. We’ve got a wonderful nursing school in this community, turning out compassionate, knowledgeable nurses who will be providing care for all of us and our families, so it’s important that we help them succeed.”
The 2018 Notes for Nurses will feature dinner by Sammy B’s, entertainment by the Jimmy Church Band, silent and live auctions, a cash bar, music and dancing. The main event will start at 6:30 p.m., with a VIP reception for sponsors and special guests starting at 5:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www.notesfornurses.com and clicking the “Tickets” tab or contacting Cheryl Bockstruck at 615-547-1245 to reserve
seating. General Admission is $75.00 and Alumni General Admission is $50.00.
Table sponsorships for the event are available and include a table for eight guests and recognition in the printed program and social media, while a VIP table sponsorship also includes tickets for two guests to the pre-event meet and greet VIP reception with the featured artists. Sponsorships are a great opportunity to show your support and also enjoy a fun evening. This year’s Presenting Sponsor will be Frank and Cindy Rudy and the Champion of Nursing Sponsor is Tennova Healthcare.
Interim Dean Dr. Joy Kimbrell, another strong advocate of the school and it’s students, notes that “the Rudy School of Nursing and Health Professions is helping meet the growing demand for nurses. There are more job opportunities for registered nurses, in a variety of settings than ever before in my forty-two years as a registered nurse. CU nursing graduates have a reputation as strong clinicians and are sought after to hire upon graduation by many of the leaders in the healthcare industry in middle Tennessee. Our nursing professors are all experienced, dedicated nurse educators who care deeply about the quality of instruction they provide our students. They work tirelessly to think of new creative ways to bring relevant clinical learning situations to the classroom, labs and clinical sites. They are engaged with our students on a day-to-day basis to ensure their success and promote deep learning.”
Her sentiments are reflected in that this year alone, Cumberland University Nursing Program, will graduate 116 nursing school graduates. In the past 25 years, there have been over 1,525 alumni to graduate, with CU nursing graduates employed in more than 20 different hospitals and other health agencies in middle Tennessee.
2018 promises to be a big year for CU’s Rudy School of Nursing and Health Professions, with its future looking brighter than ever. In March of 2018, Cumberland University announced that Dr. Mary Bess Griffith had been hired as the new dean of the Rudy School of Nursing and Health Professions and will be taking over her new post in mid-summer. Dr. Griffith holds a doctorate in nursing from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville as well as a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Masters of Science in Nursing degree from the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences at Memphis. She is a certified nurse educator, a certificate holder in simulation and a certificated nurse practitioner.
Dr. Bill Mckee, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Cumberland University remarked that “we are pleased to welcome
Dr. Griffith to the Cumberland University family. She comes to us with a wealth of experience in teaching future nurses. Cumberland
students will continue to enjoy a nursing program of the highest quality.”
Cumberland University, with one of the longest and richest histories of any higher education institution in the state, no doubt continues to flourish today as is evident by the caliber of students, instructors, and community leaders who work tirelessly to support the local University. And this year, you can be part of it as well. So save the date, purchase your tickets and let’s get ready for a fun evening of fundraising and fellowship!

Midway + mAGic = Memories. The Wilson County Fair is coming to town!


It’s getting so close. That time of year where kids relish getting to stay out late on school nights and testing their bravery by stepping inside steel contraptions with names like “crazy mouse” and “zero gravity.” While adults like to test the true effectiveness of Spanx by indulging in fried foods during those eight glorious days in August when the Wilson County Fair opens for business.
The fair is about more than rides and fried foods. In fact, the Wilson County Fair, like state and county fairs around the country, began as a way to provide a meeting place for farmers to promote local crops to the general public. Wilson County Fair Executive Director Helen McPeak says the hard work farmers and exhibitors put into what they do is evident. “There is nothing better than the feeling of working hard getting your cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, horses ready all year just to show your animal or reap the rewards of growing and exhibiting your own fruits or vegetables, or spend hours piecing and quilting and all the many other exhibits people can enter in the fair just for the satisfaction of competing and winning that blue ribbon.” McPeak continues, “It’s not all about winning, just participating, getting to know others in the competition and making friendships to last a life time.”
The Wilson County fair is bringing the AG front and center with this year’s theme; mAGic Memories. According to McPeak the theme is an essential part of the planning process. “We use a different ag commodity to help promote the fair each year. That’s why AG is capitalized in mAGic. We are celebrating the Year of Milk in 2018. Dairy farming isn’t easy. What better year to promote milk and the three dairy farms operating in Wilson County.”
There’s plenty of mAGic Memories to be had during the fair too. “It’s magic when people make going to the Fair family time. There have been wedding proposals made during the Fair, even weddings. People travel for miles and visit family and friends just to make their annual trip to the Fair.” McPeak adds.
Reithoffer Shows has been secured as the carnival ride provider this year. Reithoffer is the oldest traveling carnival company and only five generational family owned and operated show, which has the largest, most modern inventory and unique one of a kind rides in America. In business since 1896, this will be their first time in Tennessee. With more than 50 state of the art rides-including the 65-foot-tall Euro Slide, thrill seeking kids and adults shouldn’t be at a loss for entertainment on the midway.
More than 1,000 volunteers contribute nearly 80,000 hours making sure that each of the 150 events and exhibits is successful and fun. “These volunteers are committed, passionate, dependable and the best volunteers in the world. They are talented and creative and always thinking of ways to make their areas better and coming up with new ideas to make it different and better.”
2013 holds the record for highest attendance at 589,229. “If the weather cooperates, I’m sure we will have more than 500,000 and who knows, we might even break the 2013 record,” McPeak says with confidence.
 

Valuable info about the 2018 Wilson County Fair

Fair dates August 17-25 Admission: $12 Adults; $6 Children 6-12 years of age; FREE Children 5 and under
You can purchase adult tickets online before the Fair for $10 if you purchase before August 16. After this, admission is regular price. You can also purchase MEGA TICKETS online for $25 which includes admission to the Fair and ride armband. These are offered for a limited time before August 16 and will not be available after this date. You can visit the Fairs website at www.wilsoncountyfair.net to see the different discounts, pricing and check out what days different events are held so you can plan your visits. Season Tickets are $45 good for admission all 9 days of the Fair, which is a $108 value. The Great Give Away is a popular event during the Fair. $1,000 will be given away on the nights of Friday, August 17, Sunday, August 19, Monday, August 20, Wednesday, August 23, and Thursday, August 24 at the fair, but the car, truck or tractor giveaway will be held on Tuesday, August 21 at 8:30 pm. But get there early to get a seat in the grandstand. You must present the winning ticket at the drawing within the allotted time. 2018 Wilson County Fair is presented by Middle Tennessee Ford Dealers as the title sponsor. Other premiere sponsors include Bates Ford, John Deere, TN Lottery, Middle Tennessee Electric Corp, Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Tennova, Coca-Cola, Lochinvar, Farm Bureau, Demos.